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Plus Size Models
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DSA 
Posted 1/10/2010 10:40 PM
Supreme Being
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Marilyn Monroe would be considered 'plus size' by today's standards.  What a shameful time we live in.  A woman is supposed to be soft and have curves, not be angular and boney.
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Posted 1/11/2010 9:56 PM


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It's true, DSA, "today's standards" tend to be thin is in. That has been true in other times, too, as in Wallace Simpson's famous quote from the 30's/40's: "One can never be too rich or too thin".

Some lovely curvy women shown on this thread - much appreciated.
Beauty/sex appeal comes in many size packages.

I'd like to add Tosha from twilightwomen. She has a bit of a Marilyn look, too. (Sorry I don't have a pic to show you.)
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Posted 1/14/2010 6:29 PM


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Lezfriend: I feel the same way, but the fashion industry apparently for the most part has had a different perception.  According to all too many of these fashionistas, anyone who does not have a figure that borders on the anorexic or skeletal is considered plus size. Fortunately, this attitude is starting to change with the emergence of models like the beautiful Crystal Renn.

Speaking of Ms. Renn, there's an aritcle on NYT about her yesterday with the title of "The Triumph of The Size 12s" which is her size.  Just to show you how out of whack the fashion industry is: she is referred to again and again as a "plus-size model," while the average American woman is a size 14!

Here's the picture of Ms. Renn in that article, looking in no way "plus" anything.  She looks just right.

Also, thanks for the link to the V Magazine page.  The "Day 1" material is actually more interesting (to me anyway) than the "Day 2" page you linked directly.  "Day 1" actually featured a "competition" between Ms. Renn and another model named Jacquelyn Jablonski, who is a size 2 (no doubt she eats carrots dipped in water for lunch ).  They are all dressed in the same clothing so you can clearly judge the difference size makes.  Though Ms. Jablonski is attractive in her own way, methinks there's no competition.  http://models.com/v-magazine/v-size-1.html

p.s.: what is up with those stripper shoes?

 

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Posted 1/14/2010 8:38 PM


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Lez Friend and FF Fanatic while I agree that the fashion industry promotes unrealistic female images, you cannot take the consumer out of the mix. Without the brain dead other side of the coin, the fashion industry would be quite different. Of course, you could say that about just about any dysfunctional relationship.

saint george, I echo your sentiments about Tosha and I would like to add Gena. I love them both (in all their "plus-sized glory) in Girlfriends and getting a little "fed up" in the Cake clips. Ah the joy of food. I am sure I have decent picture in my archive somewhere. When I find them, I will post.
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Posted 1/14/2010 11:07 PM


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I think FF Fanatic summed it up best by saying that 'plus size is regular size.'  If given the choice, I think more people would prefer plus size to minus size.  It seems that at long last albeit gradually, the fashion industry is finally starting to catch on to that reality.

Plus-Size Models Glamour Magazine November 2009

On : 2009 Oct 01

Glamour November

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Posted 1/15/2010 1:49 AM


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I have to disagree, Lezfriend. The fashion industry will start to "catch on" when they stop the practice of relegating the fatties (sarcasm, folks) to their own special plus-size issue of a widely circulated fashion magazine, stop trying to sell size 12 women as plus-sized to female consumers, and choose models over a size 10 that don't still have perfectly proportioned tits and ass with no cellulite or belly fat. Crystal Renn is so damn gorgeous but the fashion industry sells her as some kind of concession to women who want to see larger models portrayed in magazines- she's larger than the average model, but she still is a perfect, idealized version of femininity. They are still selling you a fantasy because this sure as hell isn't my or any other woman's reality.

Designers and magazine editors look progressive and charitable while still objectifying the female form and making the average magazine reader feel inadequate. It's win-win!My name is 650013 and I've committed forum suicide.
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Posted 1/15/2010 5:39 PM


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Quote: I have to disagree, Lezfriend. The fashion industry will start to "catch on" when they stop the practice of relegating the fatties (sarcasm, folks) to their own special plus-size issue of a widely ci...

Thanks for your reply 650013. Even though Crystal Renn as gorgeous and flawless as she is in her beauty may not be an accurate representation of the average woman, I am still extremely pleased that she is visible nonetheless. 

For a good many years, the fashion industry would have completely ignored such a woman of her size and shape.  You are absolutely right that it is not nearly enough, but it is some recognition that there are some larger sized women out there and something is still better than nothing.

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Posted 1/15/2010 5:45 PM


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Absolutely, you are right. I'm a size 12, but Crystal Renn still makes me feel pretty damn inadequate- she's like a Botticelli painting come to life. Progress doesn't come in one night, it takes awhile. It IS a step in the right direction.My name is 650013 and I've committed forum suicide.
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Posted 1/15/2010 7:06 PM


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Another PS model beauty, Lizzi Miller

Lizzi Miller, a 180-pound model featured on the pages of Glamour magazine's September issue, inspired a flood of positive commentary from readers. 

Plus-size model Lizzi Miller in Glamour begs question: Is it time for magazines to show real women?

Is size 12 the new size 0?

The hollow-cheeked waifs sashaying through the latest fashion magazines may sport head-turning outfits, but they haven’t drawn nearly as much buzz as the 180-pound blonde beauty beaming out of the September issue of Glamour.

That’s because model Lizzi Miller wears - dare we say it? - size 12 or even 14. The 20-year-old, who plays softball and enjoys belly dancing, told Matt Lauer on the Today Show, “I’m not saying that a size 2 isn’t normal, but my normal size is this.”

As it is for millions of other women who peruse the magazines featuring spreads of barely-there models in size zero and below. So it was hardly suprising that Glamour got plenty of positive mail about the picture of a model with a hint of belly fat.

Glamour editor-in-chief Cindi Leive blogged on Glamour's Web site that readers were filled with “joy at seeing a woman’s body with all the curves and quirks and rolls found in nature,” and asked readers to send more feedback on what kinds of images they'd like to see in the magazine.

But don’t look for double-digit-size models to start dominating the fashion mags anytime soon.

“I don’t believe that real women are going to sell magazines, and the bottom line is that it’s all about selling,” says Maureen Lippe, founder of PR firm Lippe Taylor and a former fashion and beauty editor at Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar. “Especially in a down economy, women want to see perfection. We don’t really want to see pictures of imperfect women.”

Still, Self magazine’s recent decision to photoshop the cover pic of Kelly Clarkson to make her appear thinner elicited criticism and prompted Self editor Lucy Danziger to go on the defensive on the Today Show. “We love Kelly for the confidence that she exudes from within," Danziger told viewers, and elaborated that, on a magazine cover, "you want to capture the essence of you at your best."

Regardless of what the editors think, readers may be getting disenchanted with the unrealistic images of women that magazines feature.

“Eating disorders are everywhere, and people are saying, I don’t think this works and I don’t think it’s healthy for young people,” says Donna Reamy, Virginia Commonwealth University associate chair of fashion and co-author of “The Global Impact of the Fashion Industry and Media on Body Image.”

“Young women read these magazines and aspire to be really thin. When they can’t achieve that, it can lead to an eating disorder.”

In a recession, Reamy says, people go into survival mode and focus more on their health than they do in good times. “We are less and less about fashion and the idealized figure,” she says. “It’s more about just getting from one day to the next.”

The bad economy has caused many women to care less than they once did about looking perfect, says Lisa Silvera, who has edited three magazines and now owns two marketing agencies.

“Women are beginning to work with what they’ve got,” she says. “They are looking in the mirror and saying, 'I’m okay.' Life has gotten more serious and there is a lot more to think about than there used to be.”

Liz Canner, a filmmaker about to launch a documentary on body image, says magazines profit when women see images of skinny models and aspire to be like them.

“When women feel insecure after looking at these pictures, they are more likely to buy the products advertised in the magazine,” Canner says. “We’ve created a culture that is obsessed with perfection. If given the option, who isn’t going to try to become more beautiful?”







 

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Posted 1/16/2010 10:00 AM


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I myself is a size 20-22, working on losing more weight, I used to be over 400lbs.  I did not lose weight to be sexy, or look like a supermodel.  I am losing weight to be healthy nothing more.  I do see myself as sexy, beautiful and worth something. 

Magazines, ads and tv do promote thin to be in but now I have noticed that even the so called "plus size models" are getting to look like real women, we all have curves, some may have extra weight or wrinkles but we are all Beautiful.  We need to keep getting that across to all young women and men that no matter what be proud of who you are and what you have, no one is perfect in any means but we all are Beautiful just the way we are with Cooked noses, eyes ears and yes maybe a little bit or a lot of extra weight.  We are all worth something and beautiful.

So i applaud any attempt to show women of all sizes, shapes, skin tones and all as Beautiful.


kwolf69

Kisses, Hugs and spanking to all!  Love Ya Kat
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