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Your Favorite Twilight Zone Episodes...
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Posted 1/8/2017 11:02 AM


Supreme Being
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2) Time Enough at Last

I wear glasses and am a reader - this one always makes me smile at my own post-apocalyptic vulnerability,

~~~~~

I always loved the old Outer Limits too, and I get them mixed up. "It's a cookbook!" is one of my favorite lines from TV.

Fun thread, lezfriend.

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Posted 1/8/2017 11:48 AM


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Aristide wrote: "I wear glasses and am a reader - this one always makes me smile at my own post-apocalyptic vulnerability"

The key phrase in your observation being: "post-apocalyptic vulnerability!"

When I watched that episode, I remember thinking even if his reading-glasses hadn't broken, HOW was he going to take care of himself in a world without hardly anything in the way of food and/or shelter? Within a couple of days, Burgess Meredith's character would have begun to pine away from a lack of basic necessities. You can't eat books!

"I always loved the old Outer Limits too, and I get them mixed up. "It's a cookbook!" is one of my favorite lines from TV."

Both of those shows had terrible special effects, Aristide. I also thought that "Twilight Zone" was the more cerebral of the two, while "Outer Limits" was more sci-fi. That "cookbook" line you referenced was a classic, as the humans discover that the friendly & intelligent "Kanamits" are not being nice to us without a reason.

"The Simpsons" television show used a LOT of Twilight Zone parody-material in their Halloween "Treehouse of Horror" episodes, including the one about the little girl's talking doll threatening her father!

- It really was a great series, wasn't it?
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Posted 1/8/2017 12:01 PM


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Quote: Aristide wrote: " I wear glasses and am a reader - this one always makes me smile at my own post-apocalyptic vulnerability " The key phrase in your observation being: " post-apocalyptic vulnerability...

Food and water would be the least of his troubles...radiation sickness....that would be most troublesome.

BTW...both are TZ..."to serve man" was the cookbook episode.

Cheesy effects sunk The Outer Limits in my opinion....the series had one of the greatest openings ever...WE ARE IN CONTROL OF YOUR TELEVISION SET....

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Posted 1/8/2017 6:22 PM


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Quote: Aristide wrote: " I wear glasses and am a reader - this one always makes me smile at my own post-apocalyptic vulnerability " The key phrase in your observation being: " post-apocalyptic vulnerability...

"Within a couple of days, Burgess Meredith's character would have begun to pine away from a lack of basic necessities."

Well duh, the presumption is that he (or me in the fantasy) has a fully-stocked radiation-proof bunker. (Fully-stocked means plenty of you-know-what too, of course.)

~~~~~~~~

"Both of those shows had terrible special effects, Aristide."

There was an element of camp in that Anon. The had limited budgets so made a virtue of necessity with special effects that didn't try to be more than a suggestions of the gremlin, the spaceship or the big head-alien with the anal probe, etc.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

One that sticks in my memory was the WWI British flyer who came out of a cloud and onto a modern (1962-ish) USAF runway. "I say, you chaps really have come much further than I had realized," he says, or something like that. It was sad though. Wow, many decades since I saw that.

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Posted 1/8/2017 7:41 PM


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Quote: "Within a couple of days, Burgess Meredith's character would have begun to pine away from a lack of basic necessities." Well duh, the presumption is that he (or me in the fantasy) has a fully-stocke...

Another thing that the episode proves is that one should always carry an extra pair of specs at all times.

You never know when or where you might need them. Lol.

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Posted 1/10/2017 9:30 PM


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In "Walking Distance" I remember this wonderful exchange...

Robert Sloan: Martin.

Martin Sloan: Yes, Pop.

Robert Sloan: You have to leave here. There's no room, there's no place. Do you understand that?

Martin Sloan: I see that now, but I don't understand. Why not?

Robert Sloan: I guess because we only get one chance. Maybe there's only one summer to every customer. That little boy, the one I know - the one who belongs here - this is *his* summer, just as it was yours once. Don't make him share it.

Martin Sloan: Alright.

Robert Sloan: Martin, is it so bad where you're from?

Martin Sloan: I thought so, Pop. I've been living on a dead run, and I was tired. And one day I knew I had to come back here. I had to come back and get on the merry-go-round, and eat cotton candy, and listen to a band concert. I had to stop and breathe, and close my eyes and smell, and listen.

Robert Sloan: I guess we all want that. Maybe when you go back, Martin, you'll find that there are merry-go-rounds and band concerts where you are. Maybe you haven't been looking in the right place. You've been looking behind you, Martin. Try looking ahead.<<<<<<<<

Closing Naration:
"Martin Sloan, age thirty-six, vice-president in charge of media. Successful in most things but not in the one effort that all men try at some time in their lives—trying to go home again. And also like all men perhaps there'll be an occasion, maybe a summer night sometime, when he'll look up from what he's doing and listen to the distant music of a calliope, and hear the voices and the laughter of the people and the places of his past. And perhaps across his mind there'll flit a little errant wish, that a man might not have to become old, never outgrow the parks and the merry-go-rounds of his youth. And he'll smile then too because he'll know it is just an errant wish, some wisp of memory not too important really, some laughing ghosts that cross a man's mind, that are a part of the Twilight Zone."
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Posted 1/11/2017 9:07 AM


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Quote: In "Walking Distance" I remember this wonderful exchange...Robert Sloan: Martin. Martin Sloan: Yes, Pop. Robert Sloan: You have to leave here. There's no room, there's no place. Do you understand that...

Yes. 'Walking Distance' is an outstanding episode. Extremely well written dialogue as you have cited a prime example with the wonderful interaction between the adult Martin Sloan and his father. Plus, the universal themes of the longing for a more relaxed, less complicated existence and escape from the highly pressurized business world. Also, the desire to recapture one's youth and the lure of nostalgia. The former elements very much to be found in another similar TZ episode 'A Stop at Willoughby', while the latter elements were themes Rod Serling frequently returned to in such episodes as 'Young Man's Fancy' and 'Kick the Can.'

But getting back to 'Walking Distance', the episode was said to be somewhat autobiographical in nature because Serling spent much of his youth in Binghamton, New York and felt the longing to return to a simpler, quieter life after the years he spent in big cities such as New York and LA writing in the post WW II period.

It was also the second best Gig Young acting performance (of what I have seen with him) next to his Oscar winning role as the emcee in the Depression Era 1969 Sydney Pollack directed drama 'They Shoot Horses Don't They?' Tragically though, Gig never approached that level again career wise and committed suicide in 1978 at age 64.

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Posted 1/11/2017 10:51 AM


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Quote: Yes. 'Walking Distance' is an outstanding episode. Extremely well written dialogue as you have cited a prime example with the wonderful interaction between the adult Martin Sloan and his father. Plus,...

What did you think of "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge"???

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Posted 1/11/2017 5:10 PM


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robert0259 wrote: "What did you think of "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge"???

That was a MEMORABLE one, Robert!

And, unlike MOST Twilight Zone episodes, it wasn't originally shot for that particular show, but was actually a French production that Rod Serling bought the rights to air here in this country! There's very little dialogue in it, and what there is really doesn't require any translation.

The story itself was a good one, and it fit in perfectly with Twilight Zone's typically twisted endings! Here it is, in its entirety...

An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

The entire clip runs 23:40 (with no commercials), and it's actually a pretty decent little clip...

- Twilight Zone was a one-of-a-kind series!

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Posted 1/11/2017 10:15 PM


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Quote: What did you think of "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge"???

Very good episode. Probably not one that immediately comes to mind when thinking of the very best programs of the five seasons the original TZone ran. But well worth seeing nonetheless.

It deals with a theme that has been commonly used in literature, as well as visual dramatic depictions and that is the horrors of war insofar as the psychological toll it frequently takes upon the combatants.

In this case, the character of Farquhar attempts to escape his ultimate fate by his moments of delusion which take him to a more peaceful time and place (seeing his wife and children). But in the end, he as well as the audience comes to realize that there is no escape. Very powerful stuff and quite consistent with the TZone style of writing.

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