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VENEZUELA - socialism at work!
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Posted 8/2/2017 7:34 AM


Supreme Being
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One of the reasons why Donald Trump was elected president last November is because of the modern U.S. Democratic Party's increasing-embrace of SOCIALIST economics!

Talk to a liberal about socialism, and they'll point to Scandinavia - insisting that the U.S. economy needs to copy that of tiny Denmark's! Democrats NEVER point to all of the countless world economies RUINED by socialism!

Case-in-point: VENEZUELA - once one of the wealthiest nations in the world, before they foolishly elected Fidel-Castro-wannabee Hugo Chavez, and he attempted to turn his nation into a people entirely dependent on big-government hand-outs! Rich Lowry posted the following in the New York Post:

Venezuela: a nation devoured by socialism

Venezuela is a woeful reminder that no country is so rich that it can’t be driven into the ground by revolutionary socialism.

People are now literally starving — about three-quarters of the population lost weight last year — in what once was the fourth-richest country in the world on a per-capita basis. A country that has more oil reserves than Saudi Arabia is suffering shortages of basic supplies. Venezuela now totters on the brink of bankruptcy and civil war, in the national catastrophe known as the Bolivarian Revolution.

The phrase is the coinage of the late Venezuelan strongman Hugo Chavez, succeeded by the current Venezuelan strongman Nicolas Maduro. The Western Hemisphere’s answer to Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey, Maduro has instituted an ongoing self-coup to make his country a one-party state.

The Chavistas have worked from the typical Communist playbook of romanticizing the masses while immiserating them. Runaway spending, price controls, nationalization of companies, corruption and the end of the rule of law — it’s been a master class in how to destroy an economy.

The result is a sharp, years-long recession, runaway inflation and unsustainable debt. The suffering of ordinary people is staggering, while the thieves and killers who are Chavista officials have made off with hundreds of billions of dollars. At this rate — The Economist calls the country’s economic decline “the steepest in modern Latin American history” — there will be nothing left to steal.

Any government in a democratic country that failed this spectacularly would have been relegated to the dustbin of history long ago. Maduro is getting around this problem by ending Venezuela’s democracy.

The Chávistas slipped up a year or two by allowing real elections for the country’s National Assembly, which were swept by the opposition. They then undertook a war against the assembly, stripping it of its powers and culminating in a rigged vote this week to elect a constituent assembly to rewrite the constitution. The opposition boycotted the vote, and outside observers estimate less than 20 percent of the electorate participated.

The goal of Maduro’s alleged constitutional reforms is to no longer have a constitution worthy of the name. Immediately after the vote, his forces arrested two leading opposition figures in the dead of night. Video shows one of them, Antonio Ledezma, being taken away in his pajamas and another, Leopoldo López, bundled into the back of a car.

It looks like what it truly was — a pair of kidnappings.

Denied the ordinary means of dissent via the press and elections, the opposition has taken to the streets. Already more than 100 people have been killed in clashes over the past several months.

Worse is yet to come. Lacking legitimacy and representing only a fraction of the populace, the Maduro regime will rely on the final backstop of violent suppression. It is now the worst crisis in a major country in the Western Hemisphere since the heights of the Colombian civil war in the 1990s and 2000s.

There is no easy remedy to Venezuela’s agony. If mediation were the solution, the country never would have gotten to this pass. Endless negotiations between the government and the opposition have gone nowhere — the organized-crime syndicate that has seized power under the banner of revolution knows it has no option but to retain its hold on power by any means necessary.

The US needs to use every economic and diplomatic lever to undermine the regime and build an international coalition against it. We should impose more sanctions on specific officials and on the state-run oil company; we should advertise what we know about the details of how Chavistas park their ill-gotten gains abroad; we should nudge our allies to further isolate the Venezuelan government by pulling ambassadors and breaking diplomatic relations.

The hope is that with enough pressure, the regime will crack and high-level officials will break with Maduro, weakening his position and making a negotiated restoration of democratic rule possible.

In the meantime, the Bolivarian Revolution is proceeding according to its sick logic — and there will be blood.


- What do you suppose Bernie Sanders thinks of the devastation & suffering wrought upon Venezuela by socialism - what did Barack Obama think while this was happening?
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Posted 8/9/2017 11:24 PM


Supreme Being
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I'm afraid Trump is running into the Venezuelan syndrome having moved his Olive oil bidness from Manhattan to D.C. ... Barack and his leftovers in and out of gubment plus the Democratic media make Caracas look like a Brady Bunch marathon.

Between Mueller raiding Manaforts casa , an aging campaign honcho from the Gerald Ford failed run in 76 to having planted negative stories in the Times, CNN, the 24 hr MSDNC Trump marathons, Chavez would be proud of the dims and Obama, except of course losing the big enchilada to Middle America last Nov 8.


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Posted 8/9/2018 5:36 AM


Supreme Being
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I can't believe that it's been exactly a year since anybody (e.g. Sylvester) last posted anything on this thread about the collapsing nation of Venezuela, which is a victim of the SAME kind of socialist economic deterioration that's currently finding itself increasingly popular within today's Democratic Party!

The editors of The Weekly Standard posted the following editorial on their web-site just this morning:

A Tale of Two Cultures

Colombia is a functioning republic with a bright future. Venezuela, its neighbor, is a nightmare. What accounts for the difference?


A generation ago, Jared Diamond argued in his bestselling book 'Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies' that the most important factor in explaining why one society flourishes and another deteriorates is the accident of geography. Natural resources and climate, not political culture or worldview, determine the success or failure of civilizations. For a great many learned people in Europe and North America, it was a seductive thesis. But the present state of two South American neighbors — Colombia and Venezuela — makes it awfully hard to take Diamond’s view seriously.

On Tuesday Colombia inaugurated a new president, Iván Duque, a young conservative who won office in June by promising pro-growth policies and vowing to take a tougher stance against gangs and drug cartels.

Duque has major challenges ahead of him. The chief division in Colombian politics remains that between the urban elites and the rural poor. Marxist-communist ideals still prevail among large numbers of the poor, and although the country’s two largest revolutionary groups — the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, and the National Liberation Army, or ELN — have declined in strength, both continue to operate.

Duque’s predecessor, the center-left Juan Manuel Santos, persuaded the FARC to disarm in part by offering immunity or leniency for past crimes and guaranteeing the group seats in the Colombian congress — this despite the fact that the FARC’s leaders are responsible for innumerable murders and kidnappings. This agreement earned Santos a Nobel Peace Prize in 2016, but it was never popular with ordinary Colombians and now appears in danger of falling apart. Duque has promised to modify it substantially. The ELN, meanwhile, was never part of the agreement and fights on.

Resurgent drug cartels pose another problem for the incoming administration. The decline of the FARC has seen the coca industry rebound, along with the related cartels and gangs. Duque faces a problem to which there are few solutions that don’t involve armed conflict.

Real as these challenges are, though, they haven’t stopped Colombia’s economic progress. Foreign direct investment continues to increase; growth is at a respectable 3 percent; and unemployment, at around 9 percent, is manageable. Bogotá and Medellín, once crime-ridden, are economic boomtowns that are no less safe than similarly sized cities of North America.

President Duque sees economic growth not primarily as a means to fund more government programs, but as itself the key to alleviating Colombia’s political and social animosities. He’s right. Colombia’s greatest challenge is to include the nation’s rural poor majority in the next decade’s prosperity. Duque plans to deregulate the country’s agribusiness, coal, and oil industries; cut the country’s business taxes; and simplify the tax code. He believes in the rising tide.

Twenty years ago, Colombia was a failed state. Thanks to the remarkable efforts of Alvaro Uribe (president 2002-2010) and his successor Juan Manuel Santos, a country with limited natural resources is on the path to peace and prosperity. Venezuela, Colombia’s near neighbor, is blessed geographically with the world’s largest oil reserves and the eighth largest natural gas reserves. Yet a country rich in hydrocarbons is poor by every other measure.

The Venezuelan government no longer publishes economic figures because they would only acknowledge the truth that there is no economy. The country is in permanent recession. President Nicolás Maduro’s solution to inflation, which tops 110 percent every month, has been to remove five zeros from the country’s worthless currency — really. Nobody knows what the unemployment rate is, but most young men can only find a living by bartering or stealing. Bands of starving Venezuelans—people on what’s grimly termed the “Maduro diet” - roam the streets looking for shops to loot or trash cans to rummage.

Venezuela consistently has one of the highest murder rates in the world. Strikes and protests are commonplace — this week the nurses went on strike to protest the lack of medical supplies; next week it will be utility workers or miners. Maduro’s regime deals with protesters — pro-democracy protesters especially — by beating, imprisoning, or murdering them.

The causes of the Venezuelan catastrophe are wholly internal. Chavismo, the warped ideology of Maduro and his allies — named for its founder and Maduro’s predecessor, Hugo Chávez — is totalitarian in its aims and brutal in its means. The state dictates all and exists exclusively for the protection of its chavista rulers. Maduro controls the major institutions of government—the attorney general’s office, the election council, the court system, and a new lawmaking body called the constituent assembly, created by the president as a rubber stamp for his intentions. How easily does ordinary socialism — state ownership of the means of production — become the ruling party’s ownership of everything.

Oil is only one reason Maduro’s government hasn’t collapsed. The chavistas use the state-owned oil company, PDVSA, to buy off the military and other state officials. When the price of crude oil collapsed in 2014 and 2015, the government nearly did so, too, but it held on because the starved and dispirited Venezuelan populace lacked the will to overthrow it.

Which brings us to the August 4 assassination attempt. It seems to have been carried out with explosives strapped to a pair of small drones during a speech by the dictator. No one knows if it was a genuine assassination attempt, but the likelihood is that it was staged to supply a pretext for imprisoning Maduro’s enemies. He has openly blamed several people, including two opposition leaders, Juan Requesens and Julio Borges, each of whom now has another reason to fear for his life.

On August 8, U.N. ambassador Nikki Haley visited the Colombian town of Cúcuta, along the border with Venezuela, to announce $9 million in U.S. aid to help the thousands of starving Venezuelans fleeing westward in search of food and basic medical care. We wish the hip urban progressives of the United States, many of whom once touted Chavez-style statism, could be there, too, to witness what state control of the private sector has done to a once prosperous nation. Emaciated Venezuelans aren’t fleeing war. They’re not fleeing a country that lacks fertile topography and vast resources—Venezuela has both. Nor are they fleeing the devastation of a natural disaster. THEY'RE FLEEING SOCIALISM.


- Don't expect Bernie Sanders or Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez to bring up Venezuela anytime soon, as that nation is an open admission that Democratic-Socialism doesn't work!
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Posted Today @ 4:06 AM


Supreme Being
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Venezuela on the one hand & Antifa in Washington DC...A difference lost in distinction. Venezuela so broke so lost its citizens flee to Columbia.

Anyone want a taste of " Democratic Socialism " come to the shores of the United States or does 4.1 % GDP and record low unemployment brought to tbe country by 45 appeal to the sane ?


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